This Time-Lapse Shows How 10K Video Will Redefine How We See the World

This Time-Lapse Shows How 10K Video Will Redefine How We See the World

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April 01st, 2015

Architectural photography has become very sophisticated lately, thanks to several innovations. Hyperlapse technology has made moving time lapses easier for everyday photographers.

Professionals have access to very high-end cameras and editing equipment that can make surreal videos, while drone pilots have given us new views of old favorites, and exposed some unseen places. But the latest innovation is just good old fashioned quality. 10K quality that is.

With an astounding 80 megapixels per frame, the PhaseOne IQ180 camera gives photographer John Capra, a.k.a. Scientifantastic, the ability to shoot time-lapses in ultra-high definition. In his short film 10328×7760 – A 10K Timelapse Demo, he turns the cutting-edge camera on Brazil, and shows us exactly what it looks like when a video is made of frames that are 10328×7760 pixels.

To add to the excitement, the film is in time-lapse, showcasing the stunning definition further. The images are so big, most computers can't display it properly, so he makes the film at 14%, to fit 1920×1080, and gradually zooms in to show the full power of the camera. "This footage comes from some shots I did while shooting 4K and 8K time-lapse in Rio de Janeiro for a major electronics manufacturer," says Capra explains in his description. "Each shot is comprised of hundreds individual still images, each weighing in at a whopping 80 megapixels. Each individual raw frame measures 10328×7760."

The video starts in the favelas of Brazil, zooming in with no loss in resolution, as well as a variety of destinations across the country. 10K means that each frame is 10,000 pixels across, and the insane size of each picture means that the resolution is high enough to get 8–10 regular 1920x1080 images out of a single shot. To put it in perspective, 4K video — much-hyped at CES last month — is not yet widely available, and 10K is 5-6 times more powerful.

To think that you were impressed with the level of detail in that drawing of a fantastical Studio Ghibli theme park (which, of course, has merits of its own).

Read 3369 times Last modified on Wednesday, 25 November 2015 00:54